Fafner's Tale - part 1

A collection of fiction and roleplayed tales written by our members and friends. [Public]

Moderator: BatMonk

Fafner's Tale - part 1

Postby FafnerMorell » Mon Apr 29, 2002 10:47 pm

I ran through the night, guided only by the mountain walls on my right, illuminated by the moonlight reflected by their snowy banks. A deep ravine was to my left – it could not be seen, but the stark absence of light gave away its presence just the same. We would be meeting at the southern end of the tundra, where the mountains turned sharply and headed for the ever-frozen river, and I was late. There were more direct path, but the open tundra was deadly to the unaccompanied – traveling along the walls was safer, and thus much faster.<br><br>We had met been hunting at the south end of the river for several nights, just past where the mammoths crossed. An adult mammoth could slaughter us all with ease, and none of us individually could handled the unending waves of foes, but as a team, we could take down a calf, or a bear, or some of the orcs. We had learned quickly which of the orcs could be taken down, and which to avoid. We had also learned of the ice-boned skeletons and their invulnerability to our weapons. More importantly, we now knew how to work as one. The icy schoolmistress of Halas taught her lessons with harsh discipline, but we were willing students.<br><br>I was late. Taking inventory at Mac’s Kilts had taken far longer than I had hoped. It seemed that for every item Cindl sold, she gave away a dozen more, and balancing the books required all my financial juggling skills. But who was I to complain about her generosity, since I was often its recipient. Besides, she would not worry Morra with where I went when work was done - for if she told, it was likely I would be forbidden to leave home at all, and arithmetically minded youths are difficult to find in Halas. I had learned from a gnomish necromancer who hid by the igloos, who would teach such scholarly matters in exchange for the bone chips he needed to work his dark arts. No wizardry for me, but the basic sums I could handle.<br><br>Up ahead, where the ravine ended and the path turned left along the curving mountain base, I saw Mothball’s bright orange armor – a beacon marking the meeting spot. The armor was unusual, but not as unusual as it’s wearer, for few wood elves would cross two continents to trade their forest sanctuaries for the frozen wasteland of the north. Fewer still would choose the path of the warrior – but her quick mind, keen eye, and fearless heart showed that it was not brute strength that mattered in combat, but how that strength is used.<br><br>Her sword was new; yesterday’s rusty broadsword had been replaced by steel great sword forged by the mightiest of smiths. She swung it idly, getting a feel for its balance as she waited eagerly to show me. “Last night, after you left, McCleary led us to the giants. This had been left on one of their corpses – the giant killer said I could have it, that they had more than they could carry. We’re going there tonight for more.” I had heard stories of the giant killers and their great wealth – I had assumed them barroom fables. But Moth’s word was as real and solid as the steel she wielded (except when she was teasing. as she was one to do).<br><br>McCleary came into view at the mention of his name. He had led us to this spot, and taught us much of the tundra and the skills for hunting in it– for he had been here for many moons. His great staff was now fine steel as well.<br><br>“We’ll get you one of these tonight, Faf”, he chuckled, “there will be plenty to go around, for the dark elf can not sell them here, and there are far more than anyone could carry.”<br><br>The rogue, Delas, piped in “The merchants will pay in platinum for these. Platinum! No more selling pelts for copper or silver. A dozen swords, and my armor I can buy shall rival Brandl’s!” <br><br>McClearly waved his arm forward, and ran off, confident that we would fall in behind. Off we dashed, across the frozen river and to the northwest. Past towers and temples whose origin we did not know, the builders long past forgotten. And when it seemed like we could run no further, ahead stood a castle fortress whose name we recognized from legends.<br><br>Permafrost. Home of Lady Vox, bane of our kind.<br><br>It seemed deserted. But as we halted our run and walked towards its gates, McCleary held up his hand to halt us. “Stay away from the walls”, he ordered “for the giants will punch right through them if they sense us”. The walls were as thick as a mammoth is long, but the tone of his voice made it clear he did not jest.<br> <br>A lone, robed figure sat cross-legged in the entranceway, guarded by a standing skeleton. A necromancer, I thought, for I remembered my gnome tutor had an equally unnerving companion, which guarded him with the same ghastly resolve. Suddenly, a tower-high statue of aquamarine crystal burst through gates, and raised an axe to smite us all. Its size was such that the tallest of us could not have reached its ankle, and I stood there, mouth agape, in terror and in awe.<br><br>The skeleton sprang into combat with a crackly laugh, as the robed figured calmly backed up and waved her arms. Billows of noxious green gas floated out towards the giant, and it staggered, weakened with nausea. It lashed out blindly, unable to see, and barely able to move, as if bound by wisps of smoke. The woman, an elf, perhaps, judging by her ears, although her skin was purple like the feast day wine, simply stepped out from the giant’s path, and out of its reach. She waved her hands again - binding the giant with further ethereal ropes, and then resumed her repose, daintily folding her robes as she sat. The giant stumbled out of the fortress, towards the snow-filled ravine to which we had retreated, with the skeleton assaulting it from behind.<br><br>We scattered as a pack of rabbits before a wolf. The giant had no interest in us, too consumed with anguish, but we could barely outrun its un-aimed footsteps as it thrashed wildly about. Finally, it threw its head back, then forward, emitted a thundering death throttle, and fell to the ground in a heap far larger than any one building in Halas.<br><br>As the tremors from the crash subsided, the elf necromancer got up, walked over the corpse, and rummaged through the giant’s money belt – and upon extracting what she wanted, she returned to sitting. McCleary leaned over to her as she sat, whispering to her, but I could overhear her response “Take what remains, man-child, but keep the snow leopards and other vermin away while I rest. Do not disturb me further. And take only from the giants which fall upon these snow banks – venture not into the gateways.”<br><br>We set up camp on the bank, dispatching the occasional leopard or orc with well-practiced ease. A dozen times the scene repeated itself: the giant burst forth from the fortress in a diseased daze as the skeleton mercilessly sliced at it ‘til the monster screamed and fell dead. The blue colossus no longer inspired terror, and avoiding the death throes became routine, as the stack of steel grew. Staffs, swords, axes, and maces stuff our backpacks.<br><br>The night began to retreat before the dawn, and I began to make my farewells. I would need to reach Halas before my mother awoke and my absence discovered. I saw that within the keep, a fallen ice giant had not sought escape outside, but had fallen within the walls, its corpse decaying with a great sword still clutched within its hands. I went to bid goodbye to Delas, but he had vanished, as rogues are prone to do.<br><br>[To be continued…]<br> <p>"Sad is the man who doesn't know about the unseen forces in the universe."<BR>-- Joseph Campell</p><i></i>
FafnerMorell
 

Re: Fafner's Tale - part 1

Postby Mothball Wabbithugger » Tue Apr 30, 2002 12:08 am

FAFNER!!!!!!!<br><br>woot! <br><br>*HUGE HUG* <br><br>and all this weekend I thought you were at the national belly dancing contest! You didn't tell me you were writing a story!<br><br>It's great! Tell us more!<br><br>(only don't tell them about the time we trained the ice giants to the newbie zone)<br><br>Mothball <p></p><i></i>
Mothball Wabbithugger
 

Re: Fafner's Tale - part 1

Postby Flintrok » Tue Apr 30, 2002 7:52 am

Woot great stuff !!! <p><a href="http://www.magelo.com/eq_view_profile.html?num=36384" target="flintrok">-=Current Profile=-</a><br><img src="http://66.197.149.109/SigPics/SigPicFlint.jpg"></p><i></i>
Flintrok
 

Re: Fafner's Tale - part 1

Postby FafnerMorell » Tue Apr 30, 2002 9:11 am

Moth, honey, this is the tale of how we trained the ice giants to the newbie zone...I've just changed the names to protect the guilty and incriminate the innocent.<br><br>More will follow <p>"Sad is the man who doesn't know about the unseen forces in the universe."<BR>-- Joseph Campell</p><i></i>
FafnerMorell
 


Return to Fireside Chats

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron